It’s Worse Than You Think…

TIME weighs in on the FUBAR situation in Iraq, and it ain’t pretty.

TIME weighs in on the FUBAR situation in Iraq, and it ain’t pretty.

Important parts of the country, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Richard Myers said, are controlled by rebels. Principal cities and major roads west and north of the capital are ruled by Sunni insurgents. Al-Sadr’s men launch uprisings at will across the wide Shi’ite belt, and even parts of Baghdad are no-go zones for U.S. troops and the frail forces of the interim Iraqi government. All this has helped make the peace much bloodier than the war: last month anti-U.S. attacks climbed to 87 a day, more than double the rate in 2003 and the first half of 2004. The U.S. death toll since sovereignty was returned to Iraq on June 28 has eclipsed the number killed in the invasion, and the total tally just passed 1,000. The wounded number more than 7,000. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld estimates that coalition forces killed up to 2,500 suspected insurgents in August, but the will of the rebels shows few signs of cracking. Attacks on U.S. troops increasingly come in the form of direct fire from small arms and suicide bombs, the tactics of a more sophisticated and in-your-face foe.

I don’t know if I can really put into words just how bad it is here some days. Yesterday was horrible — just horrible. While most reports show Fallujah, Ramadi and Samarra as “no-go” areas, practically the entire Western part of the country is controlled by insurgents, with pockets of U.S. power formed by the garrisons outside the towns. Insurgents move freely throughout the country and the violence continues to grow.

I wish I could point to a solution, but I don’t see one. People continue to email me, telling me to report the “truth” of all the good things that are going on in Iraq. I’m not seeing a one. A buddy of mine is stationed here and they’re fixing up a park on a major street. Gen. Chiarelli was very proud of this accomplishment, and he stressed this to me when I interviewed him for the TIME story. But Baghdadis couldn’t care less. They don’t want city beautification projects; they want electricity, clean water and, most of all, an end to the violence.

And in the midst of all this violence, most of the Iraqi Interim Government is out of town. Security Advisors, heads of important ministries and the chief of the new Mukhabarat are all mysteriously absent. The Iraqi security forces are a joke, with the much talked about Fallujah Brigade disbanded for being feckless and — worse — riddled with insurgents who were being paid and trained by the U.S. Marines.

Thousands of Iraqis are desperate to get a new passport and flee the country. These are often the most educated Iraqis — the have the money to get new passports and travel — so the brain-drain will accelerate.

The poor and the disenfranchised are finding their leaders in the populist and fundamentalist Shi’ite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr or in the radical Islam of the jihadis, who are casting a long shadow on this formerly secular country. Iraq has its own home-grown Wahhabists now, something it didn’t have 18 months ago.

In the context of all this, reporting on a half-assed refurbished school or two seems a bit childish and naive, the equivalent of telling a happy story to comfort a scared child. Anyone who asks me to tell the “real” story of Iraq — implying all the bad things are just media hype — should refer to this post. I just told you the real story: What was once a hell wrought by Saddam is now one of America’s making.

[UPDATE Sep 14, 2004 1210 +0300 GMT: I got the below email from an MP who served in Baghdad. He’s been back home for some months in American and gave me permission to print his views provided I strip the identification from it.

I saw your comment about not seeing much good being done by the US. I don’t know what’s going on now, but that sounds about right.

From my perspective as a grunt who was on the ground, we wanted to do all sorts of things to help, but we couldn’t. No matter what we wanted to do, my squad was not going to restore electricity to Iraq. Every day for several months we had to drive past a blown up power tower with lines dangling about 20 feet off the ground. (You may be able to spot this one: it’s new now, on the western side of Tampa around bridge 18 or so). It was disgusting to see it sit there on its side for so long.
So, all we got to do were hand out crayons and soccer balls to school kids. What else could we do? We wanted to help, but we were in the middle of a war and stuck in a behemoth of a bureaucracy. Our little efforts were indeed puny on a national scale, but it’s what we could do.

I don’t disagree with what you said or how you said it. I had the same frustration. However, if all those particular people can do is open a park, well, that’s all they can do, and I can see how they would be proud of it within their own little sphere of possibility.

I should expand on some of my thoughts. I’m not blaming the soldiers or think of them as evil bastards. I feel sorry for them, being put in a horrible position, and my anonymous soldier is right: If all they can do is open a park, then I will not begrudge them that. It doesn’t hurt, and if it makes it easier for the soldiers to get through the day, more power to them. It’s better than waiting around for the next attack. And they desperately need to feel they’re doing something. Otherwise, I would think they’d go mad. At least I get to feel that I’m bearing witness or something. And I’m here voluntarily. I can’t begin to imagine how it would feel if you were sent here against your will and then told what you were doing was a big fat waste of time and lives. I feel for the soldiers as deeply as I feel for the Iraqi people. As I said once before, we are all prisoners here.

[UPDATE 2: Oops! My apologies to Newsweek for ripping off their headline. I didn’t realize it at the time.]

23 thoughts on “It’s Worse Than You Think…”

  1. Allbritton brings us the good news from Iraq

    Christopher Allbritton is a very brave journalist working in Iraq. He is clearly motivated by a humane concern for the citizens of the country he reports on. And yet – for some crazy reason – he’s not in the mood…

  2. Too many OB-GYNs aren’t able to practice their love with women all across this country

    I guess that my brief break of a month or so not posting about politics has come to an end….

  3. Big Media News

    The Bush administration has a laudable proposal to cancel billions in debt for poor countries. Which sounds great, though the article also suggests that it might be yet another great idea that this administration is absolutely unwilling to fund. Turnin…

  4. The News from Iraq

    Taliban-like Islamists now control swaths of Iraq that they could never dream of only a year and a half ago — before the American invasion of Iraq.

  5. “What was once a hell wrought by Saddam is now one of America’s making”

    Christopher Albritton has done some great reporting from Iraq, and his blog gives a real taste of what life is like for American soldiers, Iraqi citizens, and of course American journalists. Through the wonder of the internet, we are getting the opport…

  6. Credibility Miser

    Sheila Lennon links to Christopher Albritton’s troubling account of events in Iraq: Thousands of Iraqis are desperate to get a new passport and flee the country. These are often the most educated Iraqis — the have the money to get…

  7. How do we lose?

    You should go read Sidney Blumenthal’s latest column, Far Graver than Vietnam. It contains several quotes from interviews with the US military’s leading strategists and prominent retired generals, who agree that Bush’s war is already lost. A few of the

  8. Don’t They Know There’s a War On?

    I think the Instapundit must still read Andrew Sullivan’s site. Does he just skip the parts about how our venture in Iraq is a total disaster? (Honesty compels me to mention that I was a supporter of this invasion, and…

  9. Don’t They Know There’s a War On?

    I think the Instapundit must still read Andrew Sullivan’s site. Does he just skip the parts about how our venture in Iraq is a total disaster? (Honesty compels me to mention that I was a supporter of this invasion, and…

  10. Iraq:It’s Worse Than You Think…

    Iraq:It’s Worse Than You Think… I don’t know if I can really put into words just how bad it is here some days. Yesterday was horrible — just horrible. While most reports show Fallujah, Ramadi and Samarra as “no-go” areas,…

  11. WMD RIP

    David Kay quit the Iraqi survey group in embarrassment before it could present its final report on Iraq’s WMD. The investigation was taken over by Charles Duelfer and a 1500-page draft of his report is now circulating in Washington and…

  12. I See Your MP and Raise You a Marine

    In a comment to my “Credibility Miser” post, Chris Allbritton writes: You’re right to take Chrenkoff — and me — with a grain of salt, but I think I and my sources are probably better positioned to know what’s happening…

  13. Iraq: Things keep getting worse

    Weve lost this war. We’ve literally lost entire swaths of Iraqi territory to the insurgents. We’ve empowered Al Qaida and Islamist militants with new recruits and pictures of prison torture and rape to fuel their cause. We”ve stretche…

  14. Iraq out of control

    Back to Iraq 3.0: It’s Worse Than You Think… I don’t know if I can really put into words just how bad it is here some days. Yesterday was horrible — just horrible. While most reports show Fallujah, Ramadi and

  15. The Green Zone

    The situation in Iraq is being discussed daily on the campaign trail, but the news coverage about the situation has been greatly lacking in details. The problem is that it is now too dangerous to leave the Green Zone. The truth of the matter is repor…

Comments are closed.